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Minority Businesses Continue to be Disproportionately Impacted by COVID-19

Minority business owners have suffered great losses in 2020 thus far, according to a report published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Read Full Report: The Impact of Covid-19 on Small Business Owners: Evidence of Early-Stage Losses from the April 2020 Current Population Survey (By Robert W. Fairlie, NBER Working Paper No. 27309)

The number of active business owners in the United States of America is down by 2.2 million, or 15 percent, from February 2020, but up 7 percent since the low in April, according to a recent analysis report by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

A working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research said that small business owners of ethnic groups in the United States continue to be disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. In breakdown, African-American business owners are hardest hit by COVID-19 with a drop of 26 percent in business activity from pre-COVID-19 levels.

Asian business owners dropped by 21 percent and Latinx business owners down 19 percent. Immigrant business owners experienced substantial losses of 25 percent, according to the paper.

The NBER paper argued that the negative impacts of COVID-19 on minority- and immigrant-owned businesses, if prolonged, could be problematic for broader racial inequality because of the importance of minority businesses for local job creation, economic advancement, and longer-term wealth inequality.

Meanwhile, mood of pessimism pervades among small business owners. The latest Small Business Pulse Survey carried out by the US Census Bureau shows that 37.7 percent of small business owners felt large negative effect by the COVID-19 pandemic, and 45 percent of them felt moderate negative effect.

As lifeblood of the US economy, small businesses accounted for 44 percent of all economic activity and created two-thirds of net new jobs before the pandemic, according to the Small Business Administration (SBA).

In an effort to support small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic, the US Congress in late March approved 349 billion dollars to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). The program, however, ran out of money within two weeks due to high demand. In late April, an additional 310 billion dollars went to the PPP as part of the relief package passed by the Congress.

The program is intended to help small businesses retain their employees during the pandemic, offers support for businesses with fewer than 500 employees and allows companies to have their loans forgiven if they spend the money on payroll, rent, mortgage interest and utilities.

However, as small businesses scramble to apply for loans under the PPP, a few not-so-small companies secured millions of dollars of aid, sparking public outrage and raising questions about the relief package.

The picture looks grim as well for the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Advance (EIDL) program, another measure offering grants of up to $10,000 to entrepreneurs. It has ended after reaching the 20 billion dollars funding limit allowed by Congress, the Small Business Administration announced.

Source: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Beyoncé Partners with NAACP to Support Small Black-Owned Businesses Affected By COVID-19

Eligible small business owners in Houston, Atlanta, Minneapolis, New York, and Los Angeles can now apply for $10,000 ‘Black-Owned Small Business Impact Fund’ grants through July 18.

Beyoncé has partnered with The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to support small black-owned businesses affected by the pandemic through her BeyGood foundation, a global initiative founded in 2013 to inspire people to be kind, to be charitable and to #BeyGood to themselves, to others, to the community, and to our world.

“BeyGOOD announces The Black-Owned Small Business Impact Fund, assisting small businesses negatively impacted by recent events. The NAACP is proud to partner with BeyGOOD to help strengthen small businesses and to ensure economic empowerment for Black businesses.”

Special grants in the amount of $10,000 each will be offered to small black-owned businesses in five select U.S. cities, which include Atlanta, Houston, New York, Los Angeles and Minneapolis, with the specified goal of replacing damaged property.  Submissions will be accepted through July 18, 2020, and selected applicants will be announced on the singer’s website Beyonce.com on July 31, 2020.

“Over the last couple of months, the pandemic and outpours for justice throughout the Black community and across the country has been felt in every imaginable area of our lives, including in how our local businesses continue to operate,” the NAACP said in a recent statement. “The challenges of Black business owners navigating in the climate cannot be understated, as the effects of uprisings across the nation have led to many businesses being placed in dire straits due to damages and other small business needs.”

For additional details on the Black-Owned Small Business Impact Fund administered by the NAACP and to apply for a grant, please visit https://naacp.org/black-owned-business-impact-fund.

About NAACP

The NAACP, founded in 1909 in response to the ongoing violence against Black people around the country, is the largest and most pre-eminent civil rights organization in the United States. We have over 2,200 units and branches across the country, along with well over two million activists. Our mission is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.’



Wells Fargo Bank Donates $400M to Small Businesses Recovery Efforts

We’ve got to help these businesses if we want them to survive the combination of the COVID shutdown and the recession. -Jenny Flores, Head of Small Business Growth Philanthropy

Following an April 2020 industry-leading commitment to donate all gross processing fees from the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) has unveiled the details of an approximately $400 million effort to help small businesses impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic keep their doors open, retain employees, and rebuild. Through Wells Fargo’s new Open for Business Fund, the company will engage nonprofit organizations to provide capital, technical support, and long-term resiliency programs to small businesses with an emphasis on those that are minority-owned businesses.

Through June 30, 2020, Wells Fargo funded loans under the PPP for over 179,000 customers, with an average loan amount of $56,000, totaling $10.1 billion. Of the loans made, 84% of those are for companies that have less than 10 employees; 60% were for amounts of $25,000 or less; and, 90% of these applicants had $2 million or less in annual revenue. Given the federal government’s extension of the PPP, Wells Fargo will reopen its PPP loan application process to eligible customers as soon as possible through a link in Business Online Banking ® or CEO®.

“By donating approximately $400 million in processing fees to assist small businesses in need, Wells Fargo’s Open for Business Fund creates opportunities for near-term access to capital and addresses the road ahead to meaningful economic recovery, especially for Black and African American entrepreneurs and other minority-owned businesses,” said Wells Fargo CEO Charlie Scharf. “Wells Fargo is committed to helping small businesses impacted by COVID-19 stay open and get back to growth.”

According to data from Wells Fargo’s June Gallup/Small Business Index, more than half of small business owners surveyed expect either stagnant or decreasing revenues in the coming 12 months.

Accelerating Small Business Recovery for Communities in Need

The Open for Business Fund’s initial grants will allocate $28 million to Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs), also known as nonprofit community lenders, aimed at empowering Black and African American-owned small businesses, which are closing at nearly twice the rate of the industry, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research. Among the first grantees:

  • Expanding Black Business Credit Initiative (EBBC) will support the launch of the Black Vision Fund to increase the flow of capital to Black-focused CDFIs for transformational work to close the racial wealth gap in African American communities. The CDFIs will also receive capital for urgent deployment to impacted businesses in the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and Midwest.
  • Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) will provide grants and low cost capital to more than 2,800 entrepreneurs with a focus on preventing loss in revenue, sustaining employment, and averting vacancies among vulnerable small business owners in urban and rural markets nationwide.

“Black businesses have faced the largest shutdown of any diverse group in the country,” said Ron Busby, Sr., CEO of U.S. Black Chambers, Inc. “We lost 41%, or 450,000 Black-owned small businesses, in this pandemic so far and all of those businesses provided jobs so we need to accelerate an economic agenda that helps them recover. The funding that Wells Fargo is putting back into Black businesses and other minority-owned small businesses across the country is truly going to be appreciated and will give the kick start entrepreneurs need to continue and grow.”

Beginning today, the Open for Business Fund is accepting applications from CDFIs and special purpose funds formed by CDFIs serving racially and ethnically diverse small businesses for its first grant cycle, open now through August 7. Additional grant cycles focused on technical assistance and recovery and resiliency will open later this year. Nonprofits can learn more at www.wellsfargo.com/about/corporate-responsibility/community-giving.

Small business sentiment

The Small Business Index, which provides a quarterly pulse check of sentiment from small business owners on their economic situations and the wider economic landscape, highlighted higher optimism on their financial outlook in June than in April. However, this was still 19% lower than in January, prior to the outbreak of COVID-19. In specifically oversampling African American, Hispanic, Asian, and women business owners, June’s survey also observed that 52% of these owners felt the U.S. economy was in a recession or depression, while 26% said they did not feel very prepared or at all prepared for the economic downturn from the pandemic.

“June’s survey saw business owner optimism increasing as reopenings have been getting underway, but the overall data shows that for many, there’s still a long road to recovery,” said Mark Vitner, chief economist at Wells Fargo. “The pandemic’s effects are also still being sorted out as communities across the country are in different stages of recovery, so optimism around indicators like revenues and number of jobs will continue to shift as those stages progress.”

Contributing to the Small Business Ecosystem

Building a thriving small business sector has a lasting impact on communities and on job creation. Since 2015, the $175 million Wells Fargo Diverse Community Capital program has enabled more than 90 CDFIs to finance $1.6 billion in loans and offer 1.8 million hours of training to diverse small business owners, which have helped them sustain 195,000 jobs.

As part of the Diverse Community Capital program, the Wells Fargo Foundation and the National Association of Latino Community Asset Builders started the nation’s largest loan fund for Latino-owned small businesses with a $10 million grant.

Separately, in March, Wells Fargo announced it aims to invest up to $50 million in Minority Depository Institutions (MDIs) as part of its commitment to support economic growth in African American communities where MDIs, often community-based banks, provide mortgage loans, small business lending, and other banking services.

SmalI Business Index Methodology

Results for Wells Fargo/Gallup Small Business Index survey are based on web interviews with 1,478 small business owners, conducted during the period of May 29-June 5, 2020. This survey also included an oversample of diverse segments — ensuring a minimum of 300 interviews each among African American, Asian, and Hispanic small business owners. Beginning in second quarter 2019, the interview process formally transitioned from outbound phone data collection to a national small business web opt-in panel provider.


Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.98 trillion in assets. Wells Fargo’s vision is to satisfy our customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, investment, and mortgage products and services, as well as consumer and commercial finance, through 7,400 locations, more than 13,000 ATMs, the internet (wellsfargo.com), and mobile banking, and has offices in 31 countries and territories to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 263,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 30 on Fortune’s 2020 rankings of America’s largest corporations. News, insights, and perspectives from Wells Fargo are also available at Wells Fargo Stories.

Source: Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC)



Treasury Department Releases Names of Over 650,000 Small Businesses That Received PPP Loans

The United States Small Business Administration, in consultation with the United States Department of the Treasury, announced July 6, 2020, it was releasing detailed loan-level data regarding the loans made under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).  This disclosure covers each of the 4.9 million PPP loans that have been made.

“The PPP is providing much-needed relief to millions of American small businesses, supporting more than 51 million jobs and over 80 percent of all small business employees, who are the drivers of economic growth in our country,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin.  “We are particularly pleased that 27% of the program’s reach in low and moderate income communities which is in proportion to percentage of population in these areas.  The average loan size is approximately $100,000, demonstrating that the program is serving the smallest of businesses,” he continued.  “Today’s release of loan data strikes the appropriate balance of providing the American people with transparency, while protecting sensitive payroll and personal income information of small businesses, sole proprietors, and independent contractors.”

“The PPP is an indisputable success for small businesses, especially to the communities in which these employers serve as the main job creators,” said Administrator Jovita Carranza.  “In three months, this Administration was able to act quickly to get funding into the hands of those who faced enormous obstacles as a result of the pandemic.  Today’s data shows that small businesses of all types and across all industries benefited from this unprecedented program.  The jobs numbers released last week reinforced that PPP is working by keeping employees on payroll and sustaining millions of small businesses through this time.”

Today’s release includes loan-level data, including business names, addresses, NAICS codes, zip codes, business type, demographic data, non-profit information, name of lender, jobs supported, and loan amount ranges as follows:

  • $150,000-350,000
  • $350,000-1 million
  • $1-2 million
  • $2-5 million
  • $5-10 million

These categories account for nearly 75 percent of the loan dollars approved.  For all loans below $150,000, SBA is releasing all of the above information except for business names and addresses.

The data release also includes overall statistics regarding dollars lent per state, loan amounts, top lenders, and distribution by industry.  The loans have reached diverse communities proportionally, across all income levels and demographics.

In addition, the data provides information regarding the sizes of participating lenders and participation by community development financial institutions, minority depository institutions, Farm Credit System institutions, fintechs and other nonbanks, and other types of lenders.  It further contains data showing the reach of the program in underserved communities, rural communities, historically underutilized business zones (HUBZones), and participation by religious, grantmaking, civil, professional, and other similar organizations.

Source: Treasury Department



Diversity Leader Beverly Jennings Launches the SEE Company

Advising, consulting and coaching corporations and business leaders to “see everyone elevate”

Beverly Jennings, former Head of Global Supplier Diversity and Inclusion at Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), has launched SEE Company to enable diversity-forward and inclusion-focused enterprises to achieve significant growth.

As Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Jennings brings her C-level business knowledge, values-driven leadership and supplier diversity expertise to corporations and business owners, preparing them to succeed in an ever-changing environment.

With her signature approach and energy, Jennings is leading SEE Company with her vision to “see everyone elevate.” As a trusted advisor and certified business coach, she offers strategies and guidance for executives to deliver measurable success. Her three decades of experience span customer service, process excellence, end-to-end supply chain management and business development.

Jennings also extends her knowledge to Boards of growth-oriented organizations. She is Vice Chair and Executive Committee member of the Billion Dollar Roundtable (BDR), a non-profit of companies spending $1 billion or more annually with diverse suppliers, which J&J joined as the first healthcare company. She co-chairs the BDR Global Committee and leads the BDR Triad, which connects corporations, diverse businesses and investors for growth.

She is a member of the Board of Directors for Turtle & Hughes, one of the largest independent electrical and industrial distributors in the nation, and serves on the Board of Rose International, one of the leading minority- and woman-owned providers of workforce and technology solutions.

Her previous role at Johnson & Johnson was Vice President, Worldwide Process Excellence, Consumer Group. Earlier, she was Director of Manufacturing at Vistakon, now Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, with responsibility for 1,200 employees. Prior to that she served in a variety of Director positions including Quality, Customer Service and Distribution. For eight years, she co-chaired the African American Leadership Council National Employee Resource Group with 35 chapters and 1,500 members. In addition to healthcare, Jennings’ management experience encompasses the retail and food industries.

Jennings previously served as a board member to the Healthcare Supplier Diversity Alliance, the Women Presidents’ Education Organization (WPEO), Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), Community First Credit Union and the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council.

She has been recognized as a champion, sponsor, mentor and advocate for business and community. These include J&J’s Top 25 People of the Year, the Diverse Manufacturing Supply Chain Alliance (DMSCA) Legacy Award, the WBE Hall of Fame and a Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneur (LWE) in New Jersey. She also received the WBENC Applause Award, the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) Masked Award, and was a Gateway Girl Scouts Woman of Distinction.

Source: See Company



Diversity Capital and NAACP Collaborate to Finance and Advise Minority Businesses

Diversity Capital and NAACP announces a joint venture to finance and advise Minority Business Enterprises

Diversity Capital Company, LLC (DiversityCapCo), a subsidiary of NexTier Companies, LLC, and the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People, Inc. (NAACP) have announced the formation of a new economic empowerment platform powered by DiversityCapCo.

With economic self-sufficiency at the forefront of every discussion that addresses economic parity, the NACCP and DiversityCapCo have decided to collaborate to provide financing and technical assistance to support the minority business community.

The parties have agreed to work together to operationalize the economic empowerment platform powered by DiversityCapCo.  The effort is consistent with the NAACP mission and addresses the short-, medium- and long-term financing and advisory needs of the many entrepreneurs in the NAACP ecosystem.  The goal is to deploy between $500 million to $1 billion over the next five to seven years in the minority business community by developing and staffing an outreach campaign in the largest 25 cities, and surrounding regions, in the United States in collaboration with the NAACP field offices.

Derrick Johnson, the President and Chief Executive Officer of the NAACP stated, “Our effort is one, among a number of critical elements, that will support the survival of the minority business community.”  The NAACP and DiversityCapCo teams will work closely to leverage their respective C-suite access to secure funding to support the various funding vehicles within the economic empowerment platform powered by DiversityCapCo.

Mr. Lawrence C. Manson, Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of DiversityCapCo, stated that “the company was formed to supplement the urgent need for financing for the minority business community while serving as the engine for the economic empowerment platform powered by DiversityCapCo.”

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About Diversity Capital Company

DiversityCapCo was founded in 2020 as a finance company exclusively dedicated to the minority business community.  Our mission is to expand access to capital and critical advice necessary to assure the survival, stabilization and success of the minority business community.

About NAACP

The NAACP, founded in 1909 in response to the ongoing violence against Black people around the country, is the largest and most pre-eminent civil rights organization in the United States. We have over 2,200 units and branches across the country, along with well over two million activists. Our mission is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.

Source: NAACP



Kaiser Permanente Stepping Up Its Commitment To Workplace Inclusiveness and Supplier Diversity

The company’s actions – which will include a $60 million joint investment with LISC and $40M in grant funding – will support more than 2,000 Black-owned businesses and businesses owned by other underrepresented individuals, and address deeply entrenched structural racism and the trauma and economic inequity it creates

Kaiser Permanente, the United State’s largest integrated health system, announced a series of actions –- including $60 million in joint investments and $40 million in grant funding –- to address systemic racism and lack of economic opportunities that have persisted for far too long and prevented communities of color, and especially Black communities, from achieving total health. This announcement comes as Kaiser Permanente deepens its 75-year commitment to equity and inclusion and sends a clear message that the organization stands with those who are fighting for equity and social justice.

“The tragic murder of George Floyd and so many others has reverberated around the world, pushing us to demand overdue change to a status quo that keeps communities of color in the margins and holds us all back as a society,” said Greg A. Adams, chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente. “As a country, this is a moment to define who we are and what we stand for. We must take strong action to stop the physical, psychological, economic and social impacts of inequity and systemic racism so that we can create healthier communities where everybody, regardless of their skin color, can feel safe and thrive.”

Support for businesses led by Black and other underrepresented communities

As a critical step toward supporting communities in overcoming systemic and structural disadvantages, Kaiser Permanente will provide support to more than 2,000 businesses owned by Black and other underrepresented people across the country. Communities of color are disproportionately impacted by a lack of economic opportunity, living under sustained financial strain that creates multiple barriers to good health. The health crisis and economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic are hitting low-income and communities of color – particularly Black communities – disproportionately hard, threatening to widen the health equity gap in even further.

To support businesses led by Black and other underrepresented individuals, Kaiser Permanente and the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), the nation’s largest community development organization, have launched a $60 million investment partnership to strengthen businesses in the wake of COVID-19. The partnership will provide business loans of $100,000 to $4 million. Kaiser Permanente is also designating $15 million in grant dollars to increase access to formal training, business networks, and recovery and growth capital to help businesses led by Black and other underrepresented groups overcome systemic economic disadvantage. Pacific Community Ventures and the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC) – two organizations with expertise in the needs of these small-businesses owners – will be initial partners in this work.

“All across the country, we can see that health and wealth are inextricably linked. Creating pathways for people to get back to work in quality jobs, and for small businesses to get on solid ground and grow, is so important for the well-being of the nation at large,” said Maurice A. Jones, LISC president and CEO. “This new partnership with Kaiser Permanente not only helps small businesses sustain their operations during the pandemic, but it also looks to the future— strengthening the economic infrastructure of our communities so that families and businesses can thrive.”

Grassroots efforts to end systemic racism and break cycles of trauma

Kaiser Permanente also announced actions to help end systemic racism and break the cycles of trauma and chronic stress that contribute to poor health outcomes.

Kaiser Permanente was one of the first health care organizations to recognize the link between trauma and health through the landmark adverse childhood events, or ACEs, study it conducted along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Today it is understood that traumatic childhood events – which include systemic racism as well as abuse, neglect and household dysfunction – are associated with a long-lasting, exaggerated chronic stress response that has been linked to chronic health conditions, including an increase in mental health issues. Previous studies have indicated that those with 4 or more ACEs are 12 times more likely to attempt suicide and those with 6 or more ACEs have a 20-year shorter life expectancy. Research has also shown that Black people experience 11 percent more ACEs than white people at all income levels.

Kaiser Permanente is designating an additional $25 million in grants to build upon its work to address ACEs and trauma and to support grassroots efforts to end systemic racism. In the coming weeks, Kaiser Permanente will solicit proposals from community based organizations, particularly those that are led or governed by Black people or other people of color, that are focused on dismantling discriminatory institutional practices and structures and/or on promoting healing from chronic stress, trauma and grief that stems from systemic racism and social injustice.

Commitments to workplace inclusiveness and supplier diversity

Kaiser Permanente is also stepping up its commitment to workplace inclusiveness and supplier diversity. This internal work will build upon the organization’s existing commitment to the Billion Dollar Roundtable and related efforts to spend almost $2 billion per year on women-, LGBTQ+-, veteran-, individuals of color-, and individuals with disabilities-owned enterprises. Efforts to improve workplace inclusiveness will take the shape of a workforce equity analysis to identify improvement areas and redesign core talent programs to reflect inclusion; adopting science-based strategies to further remove bias and racial inequities from the employee and physician experience; and an accelerated approach to health equity through a new advisory board.

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. https://about.kaiserpermanente.org

SOURCE Kaiser Permanente




AT&T On Track To Meet $3B Spending Commitment with Black-Owned Businesses

AT&T (NYSE:T) has announced that they are on track to meet their commitment to spend $3 billion with U.S. Black-owned suppliers by the end of this year. As of June 26, 2020, they are nearly 90 percent of the way there.

Our AT&T Supplier Diversity team remains dedicated to making a significant economic impact in the Black business community. Starting in 1968 working with the Chicago Urban League and the Chicago Economic Development Corporation, we’ve sustained our commitment of spending with Black-owned businesses for nearly 52 years.

We’re committed to equality and non-discrimination for all. We’re using our voice, and that of our employees and our customers, to drive impactful and lasting change in our workplaces and communities.

Today, we have Black-owned businesses in many areas of our supply chain. Our goal is within reach as we seek out Black-owned businesses in the areas of technology development, construction and engineering, legal and professional services, emerging technologies among others. Our commitment will continue beyond 2020, not only to generate revenue for Black-owned businesses but to also create jobs and economic impact for their communities.

“Our commitment to ensuring that Black-owned businesses and other diverse businesses have the opportunity to work with AT&T is longstanding, sustainable and unwavering. Our commitment to these suppliers will continue beyond 2020; these are not short-term commitments,” said Susan A. Johnson, executive vice president – Global Connections & Supply Chain, AT&T. “We will continue to work closely with all suppliers to foster economic growth and innovation within the communities we serve.”

One of those firms is Overland-Tandberg. The company stepped up to provide critical personal protective equipment for our international workforce within a 3-week window.

“The COVID-19 pandemic created significant challenges for many businesses and their supply chains,” said Eric Kelly, Chairman and CEO of Overland-Tandberg, a global technology company headquartered in San Ramon, CA. “Our ability to provide innovative business continuity solutions to customers in over 90 countries for 40 years put Overland-Tandberg in a unique position to assist AT&T. Our shared philosophy and commitment with AT&T enabled us to pivot and ensure the resources were available to meet AT&T’s worldwide requirements. We’re proud that we could help AT&T manage and protect their workforce and customers.”

AT&T recognizes the value of Black-owned businesses and will continue to be focused and intentional to contribute to economic equality and provide sustainable opportunities for the Black community. We remain committed more than ever.

Learn more about AT&T’s Supplier Diversity program at attsupplierdiversity.com.

AT&T Communications is part of AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T). Learn more at att.com/CommunicationsNews.

Source: AT&T Communications



Minority Business Development Agency Seeking Nominations for 2020 National Minority Enterprise Development Week Awards

The United States Department of Commerce, Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) is seeking nominations for the 2020 National Minority Enterprise Development (MED) Week Awards. These annual awards are designed to honor businesses, organizations, and individuals that have demonstrated leadership and commitment in advancing the minority business community and our Nation’s economy.

“The MED Week celebration and award program for minority business enterprises has been in existence for nearly 40 years,” said David Byrd, MBDA National Deputy Director. “In the unprecedented times our nation is facing during the COVID-19 pandemic, we will continue the tradition of commemorating National MED Week. We look forward to acknowledging, recognizing, and encouraging the well-deserved accomplishments and ingenuity being demonstrated in the minority business community at this critical time.”

For the first time, the annual National MED Week events will be a virtual experience including dedicated programming for the 2020 MED Week award winners.

Nominations are accepted in three award categories: Minority Firms of the Year, Champions of Minority Business Development, and Individual Recognition.  For eligibility information and details on submitting nominations please visit  www.MBDA.gov/2020MEDWeekAwards.  All applications must be received by July 15, 2020.

About the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA)

The U.S. Department of Commerce, Minority Business Development Agency (www.mbda.gov) is the only federal agency solely dedicated to fostering the growth and global competitiveness of U.S. minority business enterprises.  MBDA programs are focused on economic empowerment and leading minority business enterprises through business transformation. For 50 years, MBDA has helped minority-owned firms get access to capital, contracts, build scale and capacity, and expand into new markets.

Source: MBDA



2020 Disability:IN Conference To Be Held July 13-16

Update: 2020 Disability:IN Annual Conference & Expo will now be a Virtual Event due to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Start Date: July 13, 2020

End Date: July 16, 2020

Location: Online

Overview:

The Disability: IN Conference & Expo promotes an inclusive global economy that empowers people with disabilities to participate fully and meaningfully. It will empower business to achieve disability equality and inclusion. The shared commitment is to collaborate with a purpose to promote the full inclusion of people with disabilities, to inspire accessible innovation for all. This year, due to the unprecedented situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, Disability:IN and its Board of Directors have decided the 2020 Disability:IN Annual Conference & Expo will now be a Virtual Event. For more updates, please visit the 2020 Disability:IN event website.

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